Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Zebra Longfin Danio

Zebra Longfin Danio
(Danio rerio)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 64-75° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.0
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Blue, Purple, White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised - USA
Family: Cyprinidae

The Zebra Longfin Danio is a long fin variety developed through selective breeding. The Zebra Longfin Danio shares the same characteristics of the hardy and popular Zebra Danio but enhanced with long, elegant fins. This variety of Danio rerio is either silver or gold with five uniform blue/purple stripes that stretch from the gill to the end of the tail. The flowing fins of the Zebra Longfin Danio accentuate the horizontal stripes to give this beautiful fish a refined and fluid quality when it is in motion.
Native to the Ganges region in Eastern India, wild Zebra Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to slow-moving, nearly stagnant ponds. In the home aquarium, this member of the Cyprinidae family prefers a well-planted aquarium with large, open swimming areas. For the best care, keep the peaceful Zebra Longfin Danio in small schools with equally non-aggressive fish. Since they are omnivores, feed the Zebra Longfin Danio a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Male Zebra Longfin Danios are generally more torpedo shaped, while females tend to have a larger belly. Generally, male Zebra Longfin Danios spawn with and remain loyal to one female. A breeding pair should be placed in a breeding aquarium with fine-leaved plants for them to spawn over. Roughly 300-400 eggs are produced and hatch within two days. The fry should be fed small pieces of live foods, such as brine shrimp.


www.liveaquaria.com

Turquoise Danio

Turquoise Danio
(Brachydanio kerri)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 73-77° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.0
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Blue
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Asia, Malay Peninsula
Family: Cyprinidae

The Turquoise Danio, also known as the Blue Danio or Pearl Danio, is a slender-bodied, active, schooling fish ideal for the community aquarium.
Native to streams and pools, the Turquoise Danio does well with other Danio species and other peaceful fish of similar size. Kept with others in a school, this fish will be very active. The Turquoise Danio prefers a planted aquarium with plenty of swimming space available.

Turquoise Danio scatter their eggs in shallow water over a substrate of coarse gravel. After hatching, usually within 36 hours after spawning, the fry should be fed fine pieces of live foods. Sunlight may trigger spawning.

Turquoise Danios are omnivores and should be fed a diet of flake foods with plenty of vegetable matter, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Tiger Pleco (L-02)

Tiger Pleco (L-02)
(Peckoltia vermiculata)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-76° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 5"
Color Form: Red, Tan
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: South America
Family: Loricariidae

The Tiger Pleco comes from the Amazon Basin of South America. It gets its name from the striped pattern it has on its body. Constant temperature and pH levels will help maintain this peaceful Plecostomus' health. Tiger Plecos make good additions to any community aquarium.
Planted aquariums with high aeration and water movement make for a healthy environment. Rocks and driftwood help to accent a natural habitat and provide hiding spaces to reduce stress for the Tiger Pleco. A 30 gallon aquarium or larger is recommended for this species.

Breeding in an aquarium setting has not been successful yet, however, different methods are being used in the industry. The Tiger Plecostomus is an egg-layer, that tends to use plants and rocks as an anchor.

Feeding the Tiger Pleco is not difficult due to the fact that it is not a picky eater. Feeding off the bottom of the aquarium, it gets most of its nutrition from left over food and algae. If there is no algae or left over food present, supplement with high quality flake food, sinking carnivore pellets, freeze-dried bloodworms, and tubifex.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Tiger Barb

Tiger Barb
(Puntius tetrazona)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.0
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Black, Orange, White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cyprinidae

The Tiger Barb is silver/gold with black stripes and orange accented fins. They are a very lively, playful fish that prefers to be in schools.

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Tiger Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower moving fish.

It is best, when trying to breed the Tiger Barb, to house a number of Barbs in the same aquarium until they pair off. After a pair has developed, the female will lay the eggs and the male will follow behind to fertilize. The fry will be free-swimming after about 5 days. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp until large enough to accept crushed flake food.

The Tiger Barb needs to be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Ryukin Goldfish, Assorted

Ryukin Goldfish, Assorted
(Carassius auratus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 65-75° F, KH 4-20, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 8"
Color Form: Orange, Red, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: China, Farm Raised
Family: Cyprinidae

The Ryukin Goldfish has a curved backbone, a fat belly and long feathery fins. It has a small, pointed mouth and the body is typically triangular in shape. There is a distinct hump on the back immediately behind the head. The Ryukin Goldfish comes in a variety of colors, including the Red/White, Calico, Red/Black and Red.

All goldfish are members of the carp group and are generally quite hardy. The Ryukin Goldfish will do well in a tank of 30 gallons of water or more with a fine gravel bottom and hardy, cold water plants, as well as backyard garden ponds of 180 gallons or more. Goldfish are diggers and will scatter the fine sand onto leaves, injuring thin and less hardy plants. Roots and well-rounded river rocks are a good addition to the aquarium.

There appears to be a definite courtship ritual when Goldfish breed. Breeding often results in up to 1,000 eggs, with fry hatching in five to six days. The fry should be fed small pieces of live or prepared foods designed for egg-laying fish.

Goldfish are omnivorous and will eat all types of dried and live foods. Limit protein, however, to 30% of the diet. A Goldfish flake or pellet food will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Starry Night Pleco (L-59)

Starry Night Pleco (L-59)
(Ancistris sp.)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-79° F, KH 6-10, pH 6.5-7.4
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Black, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: South America
Family: Loricariidae

The Starry Night Pleco comes from the rivers and tributaries of South America. The main color is black with small white spots covering the entire body, resembling stars. The dorsal fin and tail are outlined in white, and the nose and mouth area have long bristles. Starry Night Plecos make good additions to any community aquarium.

Planted aquariums with hearty, fast-growing plants, high aeration, and water movement make for a healthy environment. Rocks and driftwood help to accent a natural habitat and provide hiding spaces to reduce stress for the Starry Night Pleco. A recommended minimum tank of 30 gallons should be provided to house this fish.

The Starry Night Pleco has not been bred in an aquarium and little is known about their breeding habits.

Feeding the Starry Night Pleco is not difficult due to the fact that it is not a picky eater. Feeding off the bottom of the aquarium, it gets most of its nutrition from left over food and algae. If there is no algae or left over food present, supplement with high quality flake food, sinking carnivore pellets, freeze-dried bloodworms, and tubifex.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Sparkling Gourami

Sparkling Gourami
(Trichopsis pumilus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-78° F, KH 4-8, pH 6.0-7.0
Max. Size: 1½"
Color Form: Blue, Clear, Green, Red
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Cambodia, Farm Raised, Tank Bred, Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Sparkling Gourami is a petite gem of freshwater aquariums. With its gorgeous golden body speckled with flecks of iridescent red and fins adorned with blue and green spots, the tiny Trichopsis pumilus is simply stunning. In spite of its beauty, the Sparkling Gourami remains humble and peaceful towards its tankmates.
Native to the shallow rice patties of Thailand and Cambodia, the Sparkling Gourami can survive in the low water level conditions with diminished oxygen levels. Because it is adapted to close quarters, the Sparkling Gourami only reaches a total length of about 1-1/2". However, for the best care, this member of the Belontiidae family should be housed in an aquarium at least 10 gallons in size.

The Sparkling Gourami will thrive in an aquarium with a variety of live plants and rocks or driftwood amongst which it can hide. An aquarium with dark substrate or slightly tinted water brings out the best coloration of the Sparkling Gourami. The Sparkling Gourami can be kept with a variety of tankmates of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, the Sparkling Gourami becomes timid around other, more aggressive fish.

The only way to differentiate the male from the female Sparkling Gourami is by illuminating the fish with bright light and looking for the ovaries of the female. When ready to breed, the male Sparkling Gourami builds a bubblenest and then begins to entice the female by swimming back and forth, flaring his fins and raising his tail. When this behavior is noticed, the water level should be reduced to 6 inches. After spawning, the female should be removed to a separate aquarium as the male may become aggressive toward her. The male Sparkling Gourami will tend the eggs until they hatch. After the eggs have hatched perform frequent water changes, especially during the third week, as this is when the labyrinth organ is developing. The fry should be fed infusoria and nauplii.

The Sparkling Gourami is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Rosy Barb, Male

Rosy Barb, Male
(Puntius conchonius)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.0
Max. Size: 6"
Color Form: Red, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cyprinidae

The Rosy Barb is one of the larger Barbs that can grow up to 6 inches in the wild. The male is red and gold with black spots near the rear and at the dorsal fin. The female lacks the red color and is mostly golden.
They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Rosy Barb is a schooling fish and enjoys being in numbers. If in a large enough school, they typically will not bother any other fish in the aquarium.

It is best, when trying to breed the Rosy Barb, to house two females with one male. Provide a coarse gravel in the breeding tank and after the eggs have been laid, remove the parents. The fry will hatch in approximately 3 days, at which time, they should be fed baby brine shrimp until large enough to accept crushed flake food.

The Rosy Barb needs to be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Rio-Negro Pleco (L 135)

Rio-Negro Pleco (L 135)
(Peckoltia sp. platyrhyncha)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 6-10, pH 6.5-7.4
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Black, Tan
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: South America
Family: Loricariidae

The Rio-Negro Plecostomus, also known as the Candy Stripe-Peckoltia, comes from the rivers and tributaries of South America. It is dark brown to black with irregular golden vertical stripes. The rays of the fins are also golden with black stripes. Rio-Negro Plecos make good additions to any community aquarium.
Planted aquariums with hearty, fast-growing plants, high aeration, and water movement make for a healthy environment. Rocks and driftwood help to accent a natural habitat and provide hiding spaces to reduce stress for the Candy Stripe Plecostomus. A recommended minimum tank of 30 gallons should be provided to house this fish.

The Rio-Negro Plecostomus has not been bred in an aquarium setting and little is known about their breeding habits.

Feeding the Rio-Negro Plecostomus is not difficult due to the fact that it is not a picky eater. Feeding off the bottom of the aquarium, it gets most of its nutrition from left over food and algae. If there is no algae or left over food present, supplement with high quality flake food, sinking carnivore pellets, freeze-dried bloodworms, and tubifex.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Monday, June 28, 2010

Red Cap Oranda Goldfish

Red Cap Oranda Goldfish
(Carassius auratus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 65-75° F, KH 4-20, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 10"
Color Form: Red, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Asia, China, Japan
Family: Cyprinidae

The Red Cap Oranda is one of several varieties of what is commonly known as the Goldfish, Carassius auratus auratus. The Goldfish originally came from parts of Asia, Japan, and China but now enjoys worldwide distribution due to controlled breeding programs. The Red Cap Oranda is typically a metallic-scaled fish. Resembling the Veil Tail varieties, the Oranda's distinction is in the "hood" that covers its head. In the case of the Red Cap Oranda, this hood is a predominant, bright red, while the body is an iridescent white.
All goldfish are members of the carp group and are generally quite hardy. The Red Cap Oranda will do well in a tank of 30 gallons of water or more with a fine gravel bottom and hardy, cold water plants, as well as backyard garden ponds of 180 gallons or more. Goldfish are diggers and will scatter the fine sand onto leaves, injuring thin and less hardy plants. Roots and well-rounded river rocks are appreciated.

There appears to be a definite courtship ritual when Goldfish breed. Breeding often results in up to 1,000 eggs, with fry hatching in five to six days. They should be fed small pieces of live or prepared foods designed for egg-laying fish.

Goldfish are omnivorous, and will eat all types of dried and live foods. Limit protein, however, to 30% of the diet. A Goldfish flake or pellet food will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Red & White Ryukin Goldfish

Red & White Ryukin Goldfish
(Carassius auratus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 65-75° F, KH 4-20, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 8"
Color Form: Orange, Red, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Asia, China, Japan
Family: Cyprinidae

The Red & White Ryukin is a striking fish with sophisticated markings. The interplay between the white and red/orange coloration is Zen-like in its simple beauty. The Red & White Ryukin, like all Ryukin goldfish, has a prominent arch or hump immediately behind the head. A curved backbone, a fat belly, long feathery fins, a pointed mouth, and a triangular body shape are other features that differentiate the Ryukin from other goldfish varieties.
As a member of the carp family, the Red & White Ryukin is generally quite hardy. They will do well in 30 gallon aquariums or larger, as well as backyard garden ponds of 180 gallons or more. In addition to a fine gravel bottom or well-rounded river rocks, the Red & White Ryukin will appreciate hardy, cold water plants. Keep in mind that goldfish are diggers and will scatter the fine sand onto leaves, injuring thin and less hardy plants.

There appears to be a definite courtship ritual when goldfish breed. Breeding often results in up to 1,000 eggs, with fry hatching in five to six days. They should be fed small pieces of live or prepared foods designed for egg-laying fish.

Goldfish are omnivores and will eat all types of dried and live foods. However, limit protein intake to 30% of the diet. Goldfish flake or pellet food will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Pink Convict Cichlid

Pink Convict Cichlid
(Archocentrus nigrofasciatus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size
: 30 gallons
Care Level: Difficult
Temperament: Aggressive
Water Conditions: 68-73° F, KH 9-20, pH 6.5-8.0
Max. Size: 6"
Color Form: Pink, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Central America
Family: Cichlidae

The Pink Convict Cichlid is a pseudo-albino of the Archocentrus nigrofasciatus Convict Cichlid. Sometimes called Zebra Cichlid or Convict Cichlid, this fish is monotone in color, with the female having an orange patch on her stomach. The male is larger, monotone, has a steeper forehead and longer fins. As it ages, the male will acquire a fatty lump on the forehead. A striking addition to any aquarium, they are not recommended for the community tank due to their aggressive tendencies.
The Pink Convict Cichlid requires a minimum tank of 30 gallons with a gravel bottom, rocks and plenty of hiding places among the rocks or some inverted pots. Floating plants are recommended as a form of cover. Because of their aggressive nature, Pink Convict Cichlids should only be housed with other more aggressive fish of the same size or larger.

The Pink Convict Cichlid is a cave-breeder and will accept a range of water conditions. To promote breeding increase the water temperature to between 75-79°F. Some females will spawn between a cave and an open area. The Pink Convict Cichlid readily pairs and forms a patriarch/matriarch family and both the male and female will care for the young. The fry will respond to signals from both the male and the female.

The Pink Convict Cichlid is omnivorous and will eat most prepared and frozen foods, including freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and ocean plankton, as well as flake food and Cichlid pellets.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Peppered Cory Cat

Peppered Cory Cat
(Corydoras paleatus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-79° F, KH 2-12, pH 5.8-7.0
Max. Size: 2½"
Color Form: Black, Green, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: South America
Family: Callichthyidae

The Peppered Cory Cat comes from the tributaries of larger river systems in South America, and is a peaceful bottom dwelling scavenger. The Peppered Cory Cat has black and dark green spots, with a white underside.
The Peppered Cory Cat requires a well-planted aquarium with plenty of hiding places that provide relief from the light. A smooth sand or gravel substrate is needed because of the easily damaged barbels. They enjoy being in numbers, so a small school of six or more is ideal for these cats.

Breeding the Peppered Cory Cat is achieved by keeping a number of these cats together and allowing them to pair off. After spawning, the breeding pair should be separated from the eggs, or the eggs transferred to another system. The fry become waterborne in approximately 5 days, at which time, they should be fed baby brine shrimp and crushed flake food.

The Peppered Cory Cat is omnivorous and will require a well-balanced diet including freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, sinking catfish pellets, flake food, frozen, and live foods. Feed a quality flake and pellet food as well as frozen brine and live worms.

from www.liveaquaria.com


Pearl Gourami

Pearl Gourami
(Trichogaster leeri)
QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 75-86° F, KH 5-18, pH 6.5-8.0
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Clear, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra
Family: Belontiidae

The Pearl Gourami is a peaceful fish that is also known as the Leeri or Lace Gourami. It is one of the most attractive, hardiest, and easy-to-keep gouramis. The body is stretched out and laterally compressed with ventral fins that are long and thin, having the look of feelers. It is covered with iridescent pearl and brown flecks that give it a mother of pearl appearance. There is a horizontal black line that runs from the lips to the tail, where it ends with a spot. The Pearl Gourami is a Labyrinth Fish. Fish in this group breathe directly from the air and must have access to the surface of the tank.
The Pearl Gourami requires a 30 gallon or larger tank with water approximately 12 inches deep, and a covering of floating ferns that may be used as hiding places. The substrate should be dark and the light subdued. The ideal tank mates for the Pearl Gourami would be similar in size and temperament. They should not be housed with aggressive tank mates, like Cichlids. They will hide in a corner, begin to loose color and may refuse to eat if kept with overly aggressive fish.

It is easy to tell the male from the female because he has extended, pointed dorsal and anal fins, and is more red. Prior to breeding, the pair should be fed live or frozen brine shrimp and worms for conditioning. The water temperature should also be raised to 80°F. When breeding, the water level in the tank should be reduced to 4-5 inches. The male will build a bubblenest under which spawning will take place. After spawning the female should be moved to a separate tank. The male Pearl Gourami tends to the eggs, and once the fry are hatched, the male should also be removed.

The fry should be fed liquid food or infusoria culture several times a day. At approximately two weeks, freshly hatched (or frozen) brine shrimp may be offered to the fry. When the fry reach approximately one month, fine flake foods may be offered. Water should be changed every two to three days, and as the fry grow larger, they should be distributed between several tanks to reduce lethal build up of wastes.

The Pearl Gourami is an omnivore and prefers both-algae based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Otocinclus Catfish

Otocinclus Catfish
(Otocinclus sp.)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 6-10, pH 6.8-7.5
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Tan
Diet: Herbivore
Origin: South America
Family: Loricariidae

The Otocinclus Catfish is the algae-busting favorite of aquarium hobbyists. Even award-winning planted-aquarium experts like Takashi Amano will employ this tireless algae eater. The diminutive Otocinclus Catfish does a great job keeping aquarium glass and plants free of distracting green. Your aquascape and schooling fish will take center stage when the Otocinclus Catfish turns problem algae into delicious meals using its sucker-type mouth.
The Otocinclus is one of the smallest catfish in the Loricariidae family. Featuring a tan with a black peppered body, the Otocinclus Catfish is an attractive and functional addition to any freshwater aquarium. Originating from fast-moving rivers in South America, the Otocinclus Catfish should be housed in at least a 30-gallon aquarium with high filtration, good water movement, and high aeration. A planted aquarium with rocks and driftwood will provide plenty of hiding spaces to prevent the Otocinclus Catfish from becoming stressed. As a peaceful and very social fish, the Otocinclus Catfish prefers to be kept in small schools.

A planted aquarium with high vegetation and some algae will sustain the Otocinclus. However, if algae are not present, supplement with a vegetable-based flake or wafer food.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Neon Tetra Jumbo

Neon Tetra Jumbo
(Paracheirodon innesi)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 68-74° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.0-7.0
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Blue, Red
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, Malaysia
Family: Characidae

The Neon Tetra is often described as the jewel of the aquarium hobby. It is easy to see why it is one of the most popular freshwater tropical fish. With their iridescent blue bodies and bright red tails, Paracheirodon innesi creates an exciting splash of color in any aquarium, especially when kept in schools of six or more.
Native to the clear water streams of South America, the Neon Tetra prefers densely planted systems with plenty of low light areas to hide. To best recreate its natural habitat, place rocks and driftwood amongst the plants for added areas of refuge. However, the Neon Tetra will tend to swim or remain suspended in the water column in schools to create a breathtaking display of color. Extremely peaceful, the Neon Tetra should be kept with similarly non-aggressive tankmates of a similar size.

This member of the Characidae family thrives in slightly acidic water with stable water parameters. To breed Neon Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeding tank" with no lighting at first, and gradually increase lighting until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 dH and live foods such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as the adults will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Neon Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Long Fin White Cloud

Long Fin White Cloud
(Tanichthys albonubes)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 64-72° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Southern China
Family: Cyprinidae

The Long Fin White Cloud Minnow is a long-finned variety of the White Cloud Minnow. Captive breeding has allowed the White Cloud to develop long fins that are appealing to the aquarist.
This easy to keep minnow will do well in the community aquarium with other peaceful fish. If kept in a school of eight or more, the Long Fin White Cloud will be more active and colorful.

Tanichthys albonubes spawns over plants in cool water. After hatching, about 36 hours after spawning, the fry should be fed small live foods such as newly hatched brine shrimp.

Long Fin White Clouds are omnivores and should be fed a diet of flake foods with plenty of vegetable matter, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Lemon Cobra Guppy

Lemon Cobra Guppy
(Poecilia reticulata)
QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 64-82° F, KH 10-30, pH 5.5-8.0
Max. Size: 2½"
Color Form: Black, Blue, Green, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Captive-bred in Asia, Central America to Brazil
Family: Poeciliidae

The Lemon Cobra Guppy is also called the Millions Fish and sometimes, simply the Guppy. It is one of the color variations of Poecilia reticulata guppy. The hardiness of the Lemon Cobra Guppy, as well as the fact that it matures quickly makes it an excellent fish for beginning hobbyists. The Lemon Cobra male has a striking metallic blue-green body with a solid yellow tail fin and dorsal fin.
The Lemon Cobra Guppy requires a tank with at least 20 gallons of water, and is very tolerant of changing tank conditions. Plants should be hardy varieties such as Java Fern and Java Moss that can handle the increased hardness in the tank. Other peaceful fish would make good tank mates.

The females in this pair are of an assorted variety; however, you can differentiate the males and females easily. The males are smaller in size, have brighter coloration, along with a bigger tail fin, and pointed anal fin. The females are larger in size with a duller coloration, have a rounded anal fin, as well as a pregnancy patch on the lower portion of the body. Ideally, the environment would have a covering of floating ferns and a breeding box to protect the fry. Adults may eat the fry if left to fend for themselves without the breeding box. The fry should be fed brine shrimp, micro food and pulverized flakes.

The Lemon Cobra Guppy is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide guppies with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Kenyi Cichlid

The Kenyi Cichlid, Metriaclima lombardoi, is an aggressive medium sized cichlid that originates from the rocky shores of Lake Malawi in Africa. The female is blue with black bars and the male turns to a yellow color as it matures.

The Kenyi Cichlid is ideally kept in a 50 gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish.

The male is sexually mature when the full yellow color is achieved, and reproduction in this species is considered easy compared to other cichlids. They are a mouth brooding species and the fry are released from the female's mouth in about 3 weeks after fertilization. Feed the fry baby brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Kenyi should be given a diet containing vegetable-based foods. Feed a quality vegetable-based flake food, algae, and other foods designed for African Cichlids.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Green Cobra Guppy

The Green Cobra Guppy is also called the Millions Fish and sometimes, simply the Guppy. It is one of the color variations of Poecilia reticulata guppy. The hardiness of the Green Cobra Guppy, as well as the fact that it matures quickly makes it an excellent fish for beginning hobbyists. The Green Cobra male has a vibrant green body with a snakeskin pattern. The tail fin is patterned with yellow and black.

The Green Cobra Guppy requires a tank with at least 20 gallons of water, and is very tolerant of changing tank conditions. Plants should be hardy varieties such as Java Fern and Java Moss that can handle the increased hardness in the tank. Other peaceful fish would make good tank mates.

The females in this pair are of an assorted variety; however, you can differentiate the males and females easily. The males are smaller in size, have brighter coloration, along with a bigger tail fin, and pointed anal fin. The females are larger in size with a duller coloration, have a rounded anal fin, as well as a pregnancy patch on the lower portion of the body. Ideally, the environment should have a covering of floating ferns and a breeding box to protect the fry. Adults may eat the fry if left to fend for themselves without the breeding box. The fry should be fed brine shrimp, micro food and pulverized flakes.

The Green Cobra Guppy is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide guppies with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Golden White Cloud

The Golden White Cloud is a striking color variation of the White Cloud Mountain Minnow. This variety displays a beautiful gold body with red markings toward the tail and on each side of the head. The Golden White Cloud is a peaceful schooling fish that adds color and energy to the freshwater aquarium.

Also known as the White Cloud Mountain Minnow, this fish originates from the gorges of the White Cloud Mountains of China. This easy-to-keep minnow will do well in the community aquarium with other peaceful fish. The hardy and colorful Golden White Cloud adapts well to less-than-perfect water conditions, making it an ideal choice for beginning aquarists.

If kept in a school of eight or more, the Golden White Cloud will be more active and colorful. A school of Golden White Cloud Minnows gives you a burst of radiant yellow color to the upper and middle levels of your aquarium.

The Golden White Cloud spawns over plants in cool water. After hatching, about 36 hours after spawning, the fry should be fed small live foods such as newly hatched brine shrimp.

Golden White Clouds are omnivores and should be fed a diet of flake foods with plenty of vegetable matter, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Head and Tail Light Tetra

The Head and Tail Light Tetra originates from the tributaries and rivers of South America and make a wonderful addition to any community aquarium. Their body is mostly transparent in color with the head and abdomen having a silver to gold coloration. These fish have a pinkish spot both on the base of the tail, and just behind the eyes, which gives them their name.

The Head and Tail Light Tetra can be housed in an aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Live plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces.

Head and Tail Light Tetras breed occasionally in an aquarium setting and a hospital or "breeding tank" will be necessary. During breeding time, the females will display a fuller looking belly, which help distinguish them from the males. Slightly acidic water is best for optimal breeding habits. After the eggs begin to hatch, 12 to 15 hours after being laid, removing the parents will reduce the number of lost fry.

The Head and Tail Light Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Harlequin Rasbora

The Harlequin Rasbora is an extremely desirable aquarium addition thanks to its gorgeous metallic coloration and ease of care. It's not difficult to see why so many hobbyists treasure it. A large school of Harlequin Rasboras fill the upper areas of the aquarium with movement and color so lively and vibrant that even non-hobbyists marvel at the display.

The Harlequin Rasbora is easily identified by its characteristic black "pork chop" shaped patch and beautifully lustrous copper/orange body. The distinguishing triangular patch begins near the dorsal fin and comes to a point near the base of the caudal fin. The patch on the male Harlequin Rasbora is slightly rounded at the bottom with an extended tip. In contrast, the patch on the female Harlequin Rasbora is straight. The female Harlequin Rasbora is also larger than the male.

The Harlequin Rasbora does best in an established planted aquarium with open areas for swimming. The Harlequin Rasbora should be kept in schools of 8-10 individuals and housed with other small, peaceful fish. The mild nature of the Harlequin Rasbora makes it a great community fish.

Rasbora heteromorpha generally spawns on the undersides of broad-leaved plants. A breeding tank with shallow, warm, acidic, soft water with broad-leaved plants should be set up. To encourage spawning, pair a young (9-12 months old) female Harlequin Rasbora with a two-year old male and offer live food items. After spawning, remove the parents and keep the aquarium dark until the eggs hatch (after about 24 hours). Feed the fry infusoria.

An omnivore, the Harlequin Rasbora does well on a diet of prepared flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex.

from www.animal-world.com and www.liveaquaria.com

Green Tiger Barb

The Green Tiger Barb's main body is deep fluorescent green with silver/gold blotches and orange accented fins. They are a very lively, playful fish that prefers to be in schools.

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Green Tiger Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower moving fish.

It is best, when trying to breed the Green Tiger Barb, to house a number of Barbs in the same aquarium until they pair off. After a pair has developed, the female will lay the eggs and the male will follow behind to fertilize. The fry will be free-swimming after about 5 days. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp until large enough to accept crushed flake food.

The Green Tiger Barb needs to be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

from www.animal-world.com and www.liveaquaria.com

Friday, June 25, 2010

Gold Longfin Danio

The Gold Longfin Danio is a long finned, gold color variety of the popular Zebra Danio. Its golden metallic body is highlighted with yellow stripes that run horizontally across its body. In addition to its attractive coloration, the Gold Longfin Danio boasts long elegant fins that flow behind as it glides gracefully across your aquarium.

Native to the Ganges region in Eastern India, wild Gold Longfin Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to slow-moving, nearly stagnant ponds. In the home aquarium, this member of the Cyprinidae family prefers a well-planted aquarium with large, open swimming areas. For the best care, keep this peaceful fish in small schools. The Gold Longfin Danio gets along with other Danio species as well as other peaceful fish of the same size. Since the Gold Longfin Danio is an omnivore, feed it a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Male Gold Longfin Danios are generally more torpedo shaped, while females tend to have a larger belly. Generally, male Gold Longfin Danios spawn with and remain loyal to one female. A breeding pair should be placed in a breeding aquarium with fine-leaved plants for them to spawn over. Roughly 300-400 eggs are produced and hatch within two days. The fry should be fed small pieces of live foods, such as brine shrimp.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Gold Barb

The dazzling Gold Barb has been a treasured member of community aquariums for decades. The Gold Barb has a mostly gold-colored body with small, dark or black patches running down the lateral line. As the Gold Barb matures, the fin coloration develops into a striking red/orange. In addition to its gorgeous coloration, the Gold Barb boasts numerous desirable characteristics sure to please any beginning hobbyist.

The hardy Gold Barb tolerates a wide range of water parameters, maintains a relatively small size, and gets along with most tankmates. The Gold Barb is not as aggressive as other barbs and will fare well in community aquariums along with other peaceful, similarly sized, short-fin fish.

The Gold Barb is a social fish best kept in groups of 6 or more. As with other barb species, the female Gold Barb is fuller bodied than the male. Classified as an omnivore, the Gold Barb benefits from a varied diet of flake, pellet, and small frozen foods, such as mosquito larvae, daphnia, and brine shrimp.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Glowlight Tetra

The Glowlight Tetra glows like a lamp when lighting conditions are just right. The colorful, neon red/orange stripe shows up best when the aquarium lights are dimmed. For maximum visual effect keep Glowlight Tetras in groups.
The Glowlight Tetra is a very popular and hardy freshwater tetra. It originally came from the clear water streams of South America. This fish has a clear body with the exception of its signature bright neon red stripe running from the nose into the tail. Glowlight Tetras are a great addition to any soft water community aquarium.

Glowlight Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants, in turn, will provide hiding places for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. It thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Glowlight Tetras are a schooling fish and are very interesting to watch in action when kept in odd numbers of five or more.

To breed Glowlight Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeder tank" with no lighting at first, and then gradually increase it until spawning occurs. Water hardness should be less than 4 dKH and live food such as mosquito larvae are great inducers. Be sure to remove the adults after the eggs have been laid, as they will eat them. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

Glowlight Tetras will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Endler's Livebearer


The Endler's Livebearer boasts swirls of neon colored patches like a brilliant lava lamp. The unique coloration of the Endler's Livebearer consists of vivid reds, greens, and black in an endless color combination. Still rather uncommon in the hobby, the Endler's Livebearer is gaining popularity thanks to its wild, psychedelic coloration and ease of care.
The Endler's Livebearer is originally from the Northeastern part of Venezuela, South America. It is related to and resembles the common guppy and is very hardy like its guppy relatives. The Endler's Livebearer will make a great addition to any freshwater community aquarium.

The Endler's Livebearer requires an aquarium with at least 20 gallons of water and is very tolerant of changing aquarium conditions. Plants should be hardy varieties such as Java Fern and Java Moss that can handle the increased hardness in the aquarium. Other peaceful fish would make good tank mates.

The Endler's Livebearer is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide guppies with the proper nutrition.

Only males are available for shipment.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Crown Tail Betta

Crown Tail Betta
(Betta splendens)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 1 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 75-86° F, KH 0-25, pH 6.0-8.0
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Assorted, Blue, Red
Diet: Carnivore
Origin: Farm Raised - Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Crown Tail Betta has a striking, elaborate tail that differentiates it from other Bettas. The Crown Tail has a teardrop shape to its tail while the Twin Tail is split, almost giving the suggestion of having two tails. The Crown Tail Betta is a type of "Siamese" Fighting Fish. These fish have been bred over the years to enhance the fins and remarkable variety of colors of the males, as well as making them increasingly combative. Therefore, only one male should be kept in a tank; however, smaller, shorter-finned females may be housed together with caution. In addition, a male and a female should only be housed together temporarily for breeding purposes. Females can be as colorful as the males, although, they rarely have the long finnage that is seen with the males.

An ideal environment for the Betta is a well-filtered aquarium that holds a steady temperature of between 75° and 86°F. Though the Betta is often sold in small bowls in department stores, for best care, Betta splendens should be kept singly in aquariums of at least 1 gallon. It also prefers a variety of hiding places amongst the foliage of freshwater plants.

The Betta can be bred in the home aquarium. For breeding purposes, males and females can be temporarily housed together. Once laid by the female, the eggs are placed inside a bubblenest and tended by the male Betta. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

Provide the Betta with a carnivore diet consisting of a quality flake food, frozen or freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Cherry Barb

Cherry Barb
(Puntius
titteya)

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care Level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.0

Max. Size: 2"

Color Form: Black, Red, White

Diet: Omnivore

Compatibility: View Chart

Origin: Sri Lanka

Family: Cyprinidae

The Cherry Barb is a more slender fish when compared to the other Barbs. The main body is silver/black with a golden, horizontal stripe following the lateral line. During spawning, the male will turn bright cherry red, which explains the given name.

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Cherry Barb is a very timid fish that should be housed with fish of the same temperament.

It is best, when trying to breed the Cherry Barb, to house a number of Barbs in the same aquarium until they pair off. After a pair has developed, the female will lay the eggs and the male will follow behind to fertilize. The fry will be free-swimming after about 5 days. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp until large enough to accept crushed flake food.

The Cherry Barb needs to be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Bumblebee Cichlid

Bumblebee Cichlid
(Pseudotropheus crabro)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size
: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Aggressive
Water Conditions: 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.6
Max. Size: 8"
Color Form: Black, Tan, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Bumblebee Cichlid, also known as the Hornet Cichlid, or Chameleon Cichlid comes from deepwater caves in Lake Malawi, Africa. The coloration of the Bumblebee is a golden yellow background with vertical brown to black bars running the length of its body.

The Bumblebee will do best in a cichlid community aquarium. Provide numerous rocks and caves and a sandy bottom with plenty of places to set up territories. A laterite-based substrate is ideal for this system as it will help to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

For best results in spawning, the males should be kept with at least three females. The female will spawn on a flat rock and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and will follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will tend to the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Bumblebee Cichlid should be fed foods rich in vegetable matter such as flake, pellet, and leafy seaweeds. Their diet should also be supplemented with meaty plankton-rich foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Emerald Green Cory Cat

Emerald Green Cory Cat
(Brochis splendens)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 68-72° F, KH 8-10, pH 6.8-7.2
Max. Size: 3½"
Color Form: Clear, Green, White
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: South America
Family: Callichthyidae

The Emerald Green Cory adds interest and beauty to the lower regions of your aquarium. This popular aquarium scavenger has an iridescent, emerald green body with pinkish underparts. In addition to an ornamental presence, the Emerald Green Cory Cat provides the valuable service of devouring uneaten food on the aquarium bottom.
Also known as the Green Catfish or Emerald Brochis, the Emerald Green Cory Cat comes from the regions of South America in the Amazon River basin. It inhabits waters with high vegetation and neutral pH.

A minimum aquarium size of 30 gallons is recommend for the Emerald Green Cory. To replicate the natural habitat of this catfish, the aquarium should be well planted with plenty of driftwood. Maintain a pH close to neutral and provide strong filtration to ensure proper health.

In the aquarium, females will collect the eggs in a pelvic fin basket and deposit them individually on plants, rocks, driftwood, and other objects. Pairs have been known to produce 900 to 1,100 eggs.

The Emerald Green Cory Cat will eat food that has settled to the bottom of the aquarium. However, supplemental foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, flake food, or sinking carnivore pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Electric Yellow Cichlid

Electric Yellow Cichlid
(Labidochromis caeruleus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 72-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.5
Max. Size: 5"
Color Form: Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Cichlidae

The Electric Yellow Cichlid is set apart from other African Cichlids by its striking electric yellow coloration. It injects an irresistible splash of bold color to the cichlid aquarium. Mature specimens flaunt contrasting horizontal black stripes and vertical bars to provide additional visual interest.
The Electric Yellow African Cichlid is also known as the Yellow Lab or Electric Yellow Lab. Considered a newer species and referred to commercially as Labidochromis tanganicae, this cichlid lives in the waters of Lake Malawi between the islands of Charo and Mbowe. First displayed at Burundi in the early 1980's and exported from there, the Electric Yellow was mistakenly believed to come from Lake Tanganyika.

A peaceful and shy cichlid compared to other African Cichlids, the Electric Yellow still displays distinct social and territorial behaviors. The Electric Yellow will act aggressively towards fish of similar body shape and color perceived to be a threat for food and mate. The aquarium should include a sandy bottom, robust plants, caves, and rocks.

The female lays her eggs on the surface of rocks and then scoops them into her mouth where they brood for 18 days before being released.

The Electric Yellow Lab needs both meaty foods and greens such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, and quality flake or pellet food containing vegetable matter.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Electric Blue Cichlid

Electric Blue Cichlid
(Sciaenochromis fryeri)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size
: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Aggressive
Water Conditions: 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.6
Max. Size: 8"
Color Form: Blue
Diet: Carnivore
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi, Farm Raised, USA
Family: Cichlidae

The Electric Blue African Cichlid creates a gorgeous, colorful focal point in the freshwater aquarium. It has the typical sleek, bullet-shaped body common to the Cichlidae family. The active Electric Blue African Cichlid seems equally content guarding its territory or perusing the perimeter of your aquarium.
Sciaenochromis fryeri does well with other Lake Malawi cichlids when provided with a spacious aquarium of 70 gallons or more with ample rockwork. Although extraneous for the Electric Blue African Cichlid, aquatic plants may be beneficial for other aquarium inhabitants. Keep in mind that Electric Blue African Cichlids larger than three inches will often uproot live plants. The Electric Blue African Cichlid can and probably will be aggressive toward smaller fish.

Considered a specialized mouth brooder, eggs of the Electric Blue African Cichlid are fertilized and carried by the female. Within 12 to 18 days, fry are released, measuring 1/4 inch. Once released, the Electric Blue African Cichlid fry do not return to their mother again. Most members of the mouth brooding variety of African Cichlids are easily bred in the home aquarium when given the proper aquarium setup and excellent water conditions. A small group of five to seven females and one male will provide the best opportunities for breeding the Electric Blue African Cichlid.

The Electric Blue Cichlid needs meaty foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, and small fish.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Blue Johanni Cichlid

Blue Johanni Cichlid
(Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Aggressive
Water Conditions: 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.6
Max. Size: 5"
Color Form: Blue
Diet: Herbivore
Origin: Africa - Lake Malawi
Family: Cichlidae

The Blue Johanni Cichlid, Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos, comes from the shallow waters of Lake Malawi, Africa. These fish are a dark blue coloration with lighter blue horizonal stripes. The females will have lighter color bellies and shorter pelvic fins.

A large aquarium with plenty of caves and hiding places is ideal for these fish. An aragonite-based substrate is recommended in order to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

For best results in spawning, the males should be kept with at least three females. The female will spawn on a flat rock, and will take the unfertilized eggs into her mouth and will follow closely behind the male until he releases the sperm to fertilize the eggs. The female will then incubate the eggs for approximately three weeks before releasing the fry. The fry can then be fed newly hatched brine shrimp, daphnia, or crushed flake food.

The Blue Johanni needs to be fed vegetable rich foods in the form of flake food, dried seaweed and algae.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Black Neon Tetra

Black Neon Tetra
(Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-77° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.5-7.0
Max. Size: 1½"
Color Form: Black, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Characidae

The Black Neon Tetra boasts one of aquaria's most beautiful and unusual coloration. The body of the iridescent Black Neon Tetra is an elegant blend of deep obsidian black paired with a contrasting bright, neon horizontal stripe of yellow-green. A fluorescent orange marking above its eyes completes the telltale markings of the Black Neon Tetra.

Praised for its peaceful nature, the Black Neon Tetra is a great addition to any soft water community aquarium. The distinct coloration of the Black Neon Tetra complements the shaded green and yellow hues of most freshwater plants. In turn, the plants offer hiding places for the Black Neon Tetra. The addition of rocks and driftwood also help mirror its natural habitat. The Black Neon Tetra thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Black Neon Tetra is a schooling fish and will do best if kept in odd numbers of 5 or more.

To breed Black Neon Tetras, separate a pair into a "breeder tank" with no lighting at first, and then gradually increase light levels until spawning occurs. To encourage breeding, water hardness should be less than 4 KH. Live foods such as mosquito larvae are another great inducer. Be sure to remove the adult Black Neon Tetras after the eggs have been laid, as they will eat the eggs. The eggs should hatch within 30 hours.

The Black Neon Tetra will accept many small foods such as brine shrimp or daphnia, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, micro pellet food, and a high quality flake food.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Black Moor Goldfish

Black Moor Goldfish
(Carassius auratus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 65-75° F, KH 4-20, pH 6.5-7.5
Max. Size: 10"
Color Form: Black, Clear, Orange
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Asia, China, Japan
Family: Cyprinidae

The Black Moor Goldfish is one of several varieties of Carassius auratus auratus. Goldfish originally came from parts of Asia, Japan, and China but now enjoy worldwide distribution thanks to controlled breeding programs. The Black Moor Goldfish is of the Veil Tail variety, and has an overall black coloration. Moor varieties have metallic scales. All goldfish are members of the carp group and are generally quite hardy.

The Black Moor Goldfish will do well in a 30 gallon or larger tank with a fine gravel bottom and hardy, cold water plants. Goldfish are diggers and will scatter the fine sand onto leaves, injuring thin and less hardy plants. Roots and well-rounded river rocks are appreciated.

There appears to be a definite courtship ritual when Goldfish breed. Breeding often results in up to 1,000 eggs, with fry hatching in five to six days. They should be fed small pieces of live or prepared foods designed for egg-laying fish.

Goldfish are omnivorous, and will eat all types of dried and live foods. Limit protein, however, to 30% of the diet. A Goldfish flake or pellet food will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Boesemani Rainbow

Boesemani Rainbow
(Melanotaenia boesemani)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 72-77° F, KH 9-19, pH 7.0-8.0
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Blue, Orange
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised - Thailand
Family: Melanotaeniidae

The Boesemani Rainbow creates a colorful centerpiece for any freshwater home aquarium. Males have a beautiful bluish purple head that fades into a gorgeous orange and yellow posterior. Though females are not as colorful, their brilliant silver coloration is equally as stunning against any backdrop of plants or rockwork. Regardless of sex, however, Melanotaenia boesemani boasts the same distinct characteristics as other Rainbowfish, including large eyes, a deeply forked mouth, and dual dorsal fins. Like many members of the Melanotaeniidae family, the Boesemani Rainbow also boasts the characteristic blackish-silver band of scales running laterally from gill to tail.

This peaceful Rainbow is a schooling fish that does best in a planted aquarium with plenty of room to swim. If a dark gravel substrate is used, the gravel may aid in intensifying the colors of the Boesemani Rainbow. When maintaining a school of Boesemani Rainbow, an aquarium that is at least 4 feet in length should be used.

An egg layer, Melanotaenia boesemani spawns on moss throughout the course of several days. The fry hatch after six or seven days and require small pieces of live food. We offer juveniles of this species, and they are too immature to differentiate between the sexes.

Although Boesemani Rainbows have large mouths, their throats tend to be narrow. Offer foods that are not too large. The Boesemani Rainbow is an omnivore and should be fed a mixed diet of prepared flakes, frozen, and live foods.


www.liveaquaria.com

Blue Paradise

Blue Paradise
(Macropodus opercularis)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 61-79° F, KH 4-18, pH 6.0-8.0
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Blue, Orange
Diet: Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Eastern Asia
Family: Belontiidae

The Blue Paradise, also known as the Paradise Fish, is a brightly colored member of the Labyrinth Fish group. The body has alternating turquoise blue and orange stripes that extend into the fins and tail. There is a spot on the gills, and a pattern of dark scaling on the head reaching over the back and fading as it goes down the back. The fins and tail have a feather-like appearance, like that of a Betta. The Blue Paradise is a good jumper, so a tight fitting lid is a must.

The Blue Paradise requires a larger aquarium, at least 30 gallons, with lots of hiding places for the female. It will not eat plants, but because of its active courtship and mock battles between tank mates, only very hardy vegetation is advised. The Blue Paradise is a territorial fish that will defend its area from its tank mates. For this reason, it should only be kept with other large, semi-aggressive fish. It will also eat smaller tank mates. Adult males should be kept one per aquarium, as they fight as fiercely as Bettas.

The male Blue Paradise has much longer fins than the female and is more brightly colored. To induce spawning, reduce the water level and increase the temperature. The male will build a bubblenest beneath a large leaf where the eggs will be stored. Breeding is relatively easy, and spawning can result in up to 500 fry. When the fry are hatched they should be fed infusoria, and when older, brine shrimp.

The Blue Paradise is an omnivore and requires both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition.


from www.liveaquaria.com

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Betta - Male

Betta - Male
(Betta splendens)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 1 gallon
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 75-86° F, KH 0-25, pH 6.0-8.0
Max. Size: 3"
Color Form: Assorted, Blue, Red
Diet: Carnivore
Origin: Farm Raised - Thailand
Family: Belontiidae

The Betta is without a doubt, one of the most popular freshwater tropical fish. And it is easy to see why. The Betta is, first and foremost, brightly colored in shades of vibrant hues unparalleled among freshwater fish. Second, this member of the Belontiidae family is hardy when kept in ideal water parameters. Finally, despite their seemingly delicate beauty, Betta splendens requires simple care, which makes them a favorite of both beginning and advanced hobbyists.

Betta splendens is often referred to as Fighting Fish or "Siamese" Fighting Fish, since it has been bred over the years to be both colorful and combative, especially towards other males. As such, only one male Betta should be kept in an aquarium. However, smaller, shorter-finned - though often equally as colorful - females may be housed together with caution. The Betta should be housed with peaceful fish that will not nip at the Betta's glorious, flowing fins.

An ideal environment for the Betta is a well-filtered aquarium that holds a steady temperature of between 75° and 86°F. Though the Betta is often sold in small bowls in department stores, for best care, Betta splendens should be kept singly in aquariums of at least 1 gallon. It also prefers a variety of hiding places amongst the foliage of freshwater plants.

The Betta can be bred in the home aquarium. For breeding purposes, males and females can be temporarily housed together. Once laid by the female, the eggs are placed inside a bubblenest and tended by the male Betta. Fry appear in about 24 hours and must be fed very small food initially, such as crushed or powdered flakes and newly hatched brine shrimp. Fry will also take finely chopped hard-boiled egg yolk.

Provide the Betta with a carnivore diet consisting of a quality flake food, frozen or freeze dried bloodworms and brine shrimp.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Assorted Veil Angel

Assorted Veil Angel
(Pterophyllum scalare)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0
Max. Size: 6"
Color Form: Clear, Tan, White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Compatibility: View Chart
Origin: Tank Bred
Family: Cichlidae

Assorted Veil Angels are an assortment of strains of the long finned varieties, and are available in an adult size. These fish may include marble veils, gold veils, or silver veils, and will add drama and brilliance to the passive community aquarium.
These fish prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming.

It is best, when trying to breed the Angelfish, to house a number of angels in the same aquarium until they pair off. After a pair has developed, a flat surface needs to be provided where the eggs can be laid. A piece of slate, a large plant leaf, or even a flowerpot should be positioned at an angle of about 30 degrees in an area of moderate water flow. The female will lay the eggs and the male will follow behind to fertilize. After approximately three days, the eggs will hatch and the fry will emerge. Feed the fry newly hatched brine shrimp until large enough to accept crushed flake food.

The Assorted Veil Angelfish needs to be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

This item ships as one individual fish. If more than one fish is ordered, you may receive more than one color variety of veil angelfish or multiples of the same color variety.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Assorted Swordtail

Assorted Swordtail
(Xiphophorus helleri)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 64-82° F, KH 12-30, pH 7.0-8.3
Max. Size: 4"
Color Form: Assorted, Black, Orange, Red, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, Singapore
Family: Poeciliidae

The Swordtail is perhaps the quintessential community aquarium fish. The time-tested popularity of the Swordtail can be attributed to its ease of care, peaceful temperament, and wonderfully diverse fin and color varieties. The most common Swordtail varieties include: Red Wag, Red Velvet, Marigold, Black Nubian, Pineapple, and Neon Swordtail. The male Swordtail is especially prized for its namesake feature, the showy extension on the lower part of its tail resembling a sword.

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

The Swordtail is a live-bearing fish related to freshwater aquarium favorites including guppies, mollies, and platys. As such, a female Swordtail can give birth to as many as 80 fry at one time. A spawning box is recommended, or if one is not available, provide dense floating cover to protect the Swordtail fry from potential predation by the adults. Unless it is your intention to breed Swordtails, the male Swordtail fry should be separated once the sex of the fry is determined. The Swordtail can begin breeding as young as three months of age and can quickly overpopulate an aquarium.

The Swordtail is an omnivore that will eat commercially prepared flaked foods and algae as well as freeze dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp

from www.liveaquaria.com

Assorted Platy

Assorted Platy
(Xiphophorus maculatus)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 64-77° F, KH 10-25, pH 7.0-8.2
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Assorted, Orange, Red
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, Singapore
Family: Poeciliidae

The Platy is an easy-care fish perfect for beginning aquarists. Also known as the Moonfish or the Southern Platyfish, the popular Platy comes in many color and fin variations, the most common being a solid, and brilliant red. Some Platy variations include Wagtail, Blue, Simpson Tuxedo, and Simpson Coral Platy to name a few.

The Platy adds brilliant color to the aquarium and they are very easy to keep. These features make it a great fish for beginners and accomplished aquarists alike. The Platy requires an aquarium of at least 10 gallons that is densely planted with hardy plants like Java Fern and Java Moss. The Platy is a very peaceful fish and makes an excellent addition to the freshwater community aquarium. Any other peaceful fish can be housed with them

The Platy is a livebearer and is capable of reproducing at three to four months of age. The male is smaller and more brightly colored than the female, and can be distinguished by his gonopodium. The fry will most often reach maturity in a community aquarium.

The Platy is an omnivore that will eat commercially prepared flaked foods and algae, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, and brine shrimp.

from www.liveaquaria.com

Albino Peacock Cichlid

Albino Peacock Cichlid
(Aulonocara sp.)

QUICK STATS
Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Semi-aggressive
Water Conditions: 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.6
Max. Size: 5"
Color Form: Red, White
Diet: Carnivore
Origin: Farm Raised, USA
Family: Chilidae

The Albino Peacock Cichlid comes from the rocky, sandy shores of Lake Malawi, Africa. They are pale in coloration and their eyes are red. The coloration of the male and female are very similar, and the male displays the typical egg spots on the anal fin.

The Albino Peacock Cichlid does well in an aquarium that is at least 50 gallons with plenty of rocks for territories and a sandy bottom. The males are usually only aggressive towards their own species unless their territory is invaded upon. Provide a ratio of 3 to 4 females to one male.

Again, provide multiple females for the male, as it will take the stress off of the female carrying the eggs. Incubation is approximately three weeks, at which time the female will release the fry. Provide the fry with newly hatched brine shrimp and finely ground flake food.

The Albino Peacock Cichlid should be fed a variety of both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Feed live and frozen brine shrimp along with Spirulina-based flake and pellet foods.

from www.liveaquaria.com